Psychoanalysis, Psychotherapy and
Marital Therapy Centre

Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy

Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy

Making a healthy decision to seek therapy
 
Many people put off seeking therapy because they feel nervous of what it might involve. Will they feel able to trust another person with their emotions? Will they have to face up to difficult truths about themselves? It's natural to feel fearful of the unknown. Deciding to get the help of a therapist takes courage and motivation but the rewards can be huge. Therapy can help you to untangle the reasons behind emotionally damaging behaviour, experience greater satisfaction in your relationships, and improve your health and happiness. 

What does Psychoanalytic Therapy involve?
 
Therapy is best described as a conversation between you and your therapist. During this conversation, your therapist will gently guide and support you as you talk about your life and your experiences. Talking freely about your feelings will help you make sense of the past and gain fresh insights into the way you interact with the world. As therapists, our aim is to help you discover who you really are and to empower you to make changes in your life. 

Therapy is not about blame. It is about being able to forgive others and, just as importantly, yourself. The therapist has no agenda when listening; they are simply there to support healthy thought and discussion.

Why have therapy? 
 
-Therapy offers a safe environment in which to explore a range of feelings and thoughts, and to work through difficult issues you may be experiencing at work, at home, and in relationships
 
-Therapy gives you an opportunity to air thoughts that are hard to share with partners, friends or work colleagues. This often involves exploring why and how negative thoughts recur.
 
-Therapy can help decipher the reasons we fall into repetitive and often destructive patterns of behaviour in our relationships
 
-Therapy can help explain why we sometimes feel very isolated from other people, and experience a barrage of negative feelings about them or ourselves

Melike Kayhan, Psychoanalyst, Psychotherapist, Couple and Family Therapist